Category: Career Tips Tools Advice

Career tips, tools, and many other resources curated by Mill Montejo & Associates at The Talent Mill.

Common Sense Reasons Why LinkedIn Users Should Be Scared of the New Open Candidate Feature

This post is intended for all job seekers that have active profiles on LinkedIn since they stand to lose the most, or gain the most with the new “Open Candidate” feature. I can introduce evidence to you that LinkedIn does not have a lock on error free web development and how mistakes with your content can and will likely happen. All users must take responsibility for their profile privacy settings, or risk being found out by a current employer while looking for another job. Sure firing you for that specific reason is illegal, but we all know there are many ways to skin a cat when we want to.

Over the past few weeks you may have heard about a new LinkedIn feature called “Open Candidate” where a signal is sent to certain recruiters that you are “open” to receiving open job offers to apply to. While turning this feature on might raise your profile within a recruiters search, I am not convinced that all the kinks have been worked out of LinkedIn’s site coding.

I have been managing a couple of LinkedIn groups for 3 years now and there have been all sorts of technical glitches which I have reported to LinkedIn support. Upon doing so I was told that they have been aware of the problems with the group notifications showing ‘errors in total number count’ and they are working on it. I have included images below of graphical interface of a mess that is my groups management console.

These errors have been there at least 2-3 years.

These errors have been there at least 2-3 years.

LinkedIn Groups Notifications Number Error

LinkedIn Groups Notifications Number Error

In this article from Design Week on September 26. 2016 by Sarah Dawood, she quotes LinkedIn as saying “this is the largest redesign this LinkedIn’s inception.” With this website overhaul going on I would treat lightly in adopting their fresh out of the box Open Candidate feature. I’ve already given this same advice to one of my very own résumé clients. It’s safer to not run the risk of letting your boss get wind of your job search and can you. Sure, they can’t fire you for looking for other work, but we all know there are ways to disguise that.

Another article I’ve recently read on TechGenYZ.com by Ankeeta Pareek shares some good tips on how to make your job searches more private. If you do decide to use the Open Candidate feature and something goes wrong, at least you will be limiting and fragmenting the online data to give you time to prepare a backup plan (i.e. attempting to delete digital trail that you were seeking other employment). Determine ahead of time if your current life and financial situation is worth risking by being an early adopter of this feature. At a time in history where even password manager sites like “Lastpass” get hacked, the DNC gets hacked, movie stars and celebrities have their images stolen, companies lose confidential data and are blackmailed, do you really think that it will matter to LinkedIn that they accidentally leaked your information? See all of their many disclaimers about the Open Candidate feature below.

This is the switch you will flip to signal certain recruiters that you're open to job offers.

This is the switch you will flip to signal certain recruiters that you’re open to job offers.

How It Works - Disclaimer

How It Works – Disclaimer

Share Career Interests With Recruiters - and more disclaimers.

Share Career Interests With Recruiters – and more disclaimers.

Open Candidate Disclaimer - whoops!

Open Candidate Disclaimer – whoops!

So the final question for you to ask yourself before you hit that switch is this; how badly do you want to be an early adopter and try out this new LinkedIn Open Candidate feature in the hopes of finding a new job? If you’re still employed it takes a bit more thought, patience, and common sense. IMHO it’s better to wait and see what happens with this feature as the website is redesigned rather than to turn on that “signal” and have it go haywire.

Be careful, and as always, best of luck in your job search.

*Have you started using the new LinkedIn Open Candidate feature to market your profile to recruiters? Are you concerned that your current employer or others will find out that you are actively entertaining job offers? Comment here or drop us a line via the contact form with any questions.  

Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer

One of the parts of the client résumé we like to focus on at The Talent Mill are the action words and phrases that jump out at the reader when they first look at your career document.  Some argue that these words are just “fluff” and distract from the purpose of the résumé to list your skills and experiences.

I would say that synonyms have been around for as long as the English language so why not pick the best ones to describe what you’re good at? Why not tell them in the strongest terms just how your brand and experience translates into opportunities for their company?  To this end, I have included a link I came across that helps you find alternate words per skill set.

“Listing of critical action verbs organized by skills. Action verbs describe key job-seeker skills and accomplishments and make employers take notice.”

Source: Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer

14 Must Follow Steps For Job Seekers

Anyone that has been working at the same job for the last decade and now has to look for work knows it's a whole new ball game.

Anyone that has been working at the same job for the last decade and now has to look for work knows it’s a whole new ball game out here. We can help.

Prepare your brain to be challenged by how the world has changed from the newspaper classified job ads with your paper résumé, to the only way to seek out, find a job, and get seen to get hired today!

Ever notice that even the Sunday paper barely has job listings these days?

As more newspapers go online it seems that the job classifieds we used to turn to when out of work are now worthless

But did you know that online job ads can also be a waste of time too?

Recruiters & Human Resources can receive upwards of a 100+ responses to one job opening.  That’s why as a job seeker, you need to work smart and not so hard by following certain strategy boosting steps:

Step 1 – build yourself a targeted list of companies that you would consider working for

Step 2 – work on building relationships with 2 people who work at a target company (1-2 people for each company on list)

Step 3 – without harassing them or becoming a pest, work towards having a real life coffee date.

Step 4 – ask them if they would be willing to introduce you to the hiring manager or decision maker for the department that you want to work for.

Step 5 – put yourself online before others do with a website, and a LinkedIn profile at the very least.  This will help you to be found online when a recruiter searches for your skills.

Step 6 – Google different variations of your name or common nickname that you have been known by for years.

Step 7 – If you find something potentially negative on the web don’t panic, but start dealing with it right away by following step 5 and maybe adding a few more social sites.

Step 8 – Make sure all your settings are set to private on all the social networks and websites you frequent.  If you make a comment you might have some control to erase it, but if you comment on someone else’s post you might not be able to ever remove it from the web.  Remember that when you are going to rage in comments on Facebook.

Step 9 – Create a twitter account and follow twitter job boards.  Just search #jobs and you will be able to find accounts that tweet about job openings.  You can also make your account private by selecting “protect my tweets” in settings although that can have a negative effect in being found for work via keywords in what you tweet about in an industry.

Step 10 – Make sure to develop a powerful keyword loaded profile on LinkedIn.  LinkedIn is the professional go to network to build connections that evolve into real relationships.

Step 11 – Work on your brand by starting a blog related to the industry you want to work in, or to a related passion or hobby.

Step 12 – Think of all the keywords related to your job title a recruiter or potential employer would use and make sure those are both in your résumé and your LinkedIn profile.  But do not make your LI profile a duplicate of your résumé or that will seem redundant and a turn off.

Step 13 – Do not write “unemployed” or “looking for next opportunity” as your profile headline.  Instead use the last title you held or the job position you were trained in, experienced in, and are qualified to be working in.

Step 14 – Edit each résumé! The reason so many people are failing at getting calls and not getting their résumé past the ATS is that they are not optimizing them with job specific keywords.  Their résumés are being pushed to the back of the pile by artificial intelligence via the Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

Recruiters will also search Google to find candidate résumés or LinkedIn profiles, but they will not search for your name.  They will search for the skills/keywords related to the job they want to fill.  You need to try to match every possible keyword they would use to find you, so you can be found in their online search and make their “short list” for an interview.

Best of luck in your job search!  #JobSearchSuperhero

Welcome to the New Job Search Superhero Blog

#JobSearchSupergero

We are working to migrate everything from our old website and upgrade to a secure site that protects our clients information as well as our website.  We hope you will join us for weekly posts about the latest job search methods, résumé writing tips, free career tools, templates, and more.

Here is some of what you’re in store for if you stick around:

Old timer resume?

Can I write a résumé without sounding like an “old timer?”  Sure, it’s being done all the time.  Just put down only the last 15 years’ worth of companies you’ve worked for, then include a section titled “Other Experience” where you list the skills gained in the previous jobs.  This way your age is less obvious and you are not dating yourself.

Do keyword research and analysis on the job you want and your current resume.

Go to a job site like www.indeed.com and search for the job you want and logistical area that you want.  Then you’re going to copy and paste the job description into Notepad or a Word document.  This is just to save it for when you lose the page.  Now go to another site called Wordle at http://www.wordle.net/create and copy and paste the keywords from the job description into the text box.