Tag: job search

If You’re Not on The Web, You’re Dead – Ten Reasons Why

By Mill Montejo the #JobSearchSuperhero

 

Ever since I left Corporate America in 2012 I have worked hard to increase my online presence through many social platforms. The inner geek in me saw the technology changes and direction many industries were taking and are continuing to head into.

If you’re not on the web you may as well be dead

I must share that many of my resume and LinkedIn clients often complain about how the nature of hiring has changed so drastically that they spend months looking for work to no avail. What are they doing wrong? Highly qualified, great references, yet no calls for an interview! The facts are simply this. Gone are the days when you could peruse a help wanted ad in the NY Times send out 40 resumes by “snail mail” and get someone to see or respond. Technology has made it possible for current employers to do more with less. On the bright side, using the same technology new industries have emerged that allow people to employ themselves with the biggest perk being flexible work schedules.

By using crowdsourced data, companies are helping to make life more efficient today for society at large. My goal is to educate clients on how we are entering the height of the technological revolution and there is no placing that ‘genie back in the bottle.’ As hard as it is to hear and accept, if you are not on the web, you may as well be dead.

the tech-genie is never going back into the bottle and is here to stay

So, if you want to be found in today’s changing technological world, you MUST have some type of web presence or you are invisible. You won’t be found and it will be extremely challenging to find that job or get that client if you work for yourself.  We need to adapt and change HOW we get noticed and connect through forums like LinkedIn or your own personal websites. If you are not on the web, you are dead.

 

Here are 10 things everyone should know about the web and how to use it to your advantage:

  1. You have to reinvent yourself. After years of work, today’s job market has changed tremendously. It used to be the norm that you could find ads online, send your resume that read “proven track record in…” Now resumes must be keyword heavy, with no grammatical or spelling errors, and plenty of numbers and facts to back up the “proven track record” you are claiming. There are many experienced job seekers for less available open jobs. It is an employers job market.
  2. Many job seekers still have a hard time believing that they can also find work by selling the skills they have built up through the years whether in school, work, or life.
  3. All they have to do is find a way to solve local people’s problems.
  4. Crowdsourcing apps WORK because people want to find the help that they need easily, quickly, and with the touch of a phone screen

If you have a smartphone in your purse or pocket then you know there is nothing more convenient than summoning it for everything you need

        For Example:

a) I needed a dog sitter quickly to check in on my new puppy on Fathers Day so I went on Rover.com’s app. Within a couple hours, a dog sitter was in my yard meeting my dog.

Need a dog sitter in a hurry? There’s an app for that.

b) I needed a gutter and tree trimming contractor. I found them via my local neighbor recommendations on the Nextdoor app that started as a neighborhood watch app and has grown to include home sales, garage sales, contractor recommendations and more.

Need any type of home services or repairs? There’s an app for that too.

c) Need an order of food picked up at a local restaurant that does not offer delivery? There are people who drive their own vehicles that now provide that service.

Think about where there are needs and sell your skills there. Go where the needs for services are.

5. People want convenience and are willing to spend a little extra, or in different ways to achieve it. Technological advances have put many people out of work, but they are also creating new innovative, and more flexible ways to work. 

6. Going to a new state and need a cheap place to stay for a couple of days? All the hotels booked or too expensive? Check out Airbnb where people like you and me rent out their couches, bedrooms, or garages for temporary use.

7. Need a last-minute ride somewhere local and can’t find a taxi or car service that has available cars? If you’re in an urban area or large city you can see available cars practically circling your home or location on a live map on your phone and summon them for a quick ride.

8. We must accept the fact that this tech-genie will never be put back into the bottle. You must adapt and change to survive in the digital economy and job market.

9. Don’t waste your energy on anger, resentment, fear of the future, and anxiety. If you can, instead turn that into renewed energy and think hard about your skills and how you can market and sell them to your local public.

10. In some cases, your clients don’t even have to be local. Because of the very same technology that’s put you out of work, people can reach and teach others stuff across the globe. If you produce online goods or services that others are willing to pay for then you can work from anywhere and make money.

 

In closing I would say that you have to think of everything as being able to be crowdsourced through an app or a website. Merriam Webster defines crowdsourcing as “the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people and especially from the online community rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.” If you teach guitar, get on a crowdsourcing app, if you teach art, do the same. The jobs and exposure could add up to future and steady repeat clients, or recruiters and employers wanting to interview you.

Want us to help you get started, or do it all for you including sending out resumes, Myers-Briggs Testing, and personal reference and background checks on yourself so you know what they’re saying about you? Send us a message at

JobSearchSuperhero.com/contact-form or see all services and schedule a time to chat with us at

TheTalentMill | JobSearchSuperhero Calendar.

JOB SEARCH TIPS BLOG

LinkedIn Success To Do List

LinkedIn currently has more than 277 million users in 200 countries and territories around the world, They host 3 million business pages, 2.1 million groups, and 77% of all published jobs. So it’s easy to understand why LinkedIn is the most popular social networking site for professionals, job seekers, and businesses, and enterpreneurs selling their services. About 48% of recruiters post their jobs exclusively on LinkedIn. After the recent Microsoft purchase, LinkedIn is only expected to grow more as Microsoft is certain to integrate some or all of its Office 365 Cloud products with the platform.

Getting to know how to navigate LinkedIn is very important for professionals in active or passive job searches. The following list has been compiled from the collective expertise of knowledgeable recruiters and resume writer colleagues that have spent years assisting job seekers with their career documents as well as LinkedIn profiles.

  • A professional photo
  • A customized profile URL
  • A keyword injected headline
  • A profile summary rich in keywords that sets you apart from the crowd
  • A concise career story that is easy to understand
  • Profile sections structured so that your career trajectory is easy to read
  • Powerful action based statements
  • Quantified achievements per job role
  • At least 50 skills that connections can endorse you for
  • Be a member of at least 2 LinkedIn groups 
  • Have at least 2-3 recommendations or more
  • Showcase certificates and highlight your education

 

Profile Sections Character Counts and Image Dimensions

With the release of the “new desktop experience” for LinkedIn in early 2017, some of the character limits and graphic sizes have changed. This cheat sheet will provide a quick reference to the current guidelines (as of November 2017).

Character counts on LinkedIn include letters, numbers, spaces, and punctuation.

Name field:

First name: 20-character limit

Last name: 40-character limit

Headline:

120-character limit

Summary:

2,000-character limit

Summary preview:

Depending on the device being used (desktop vs. mobile), LinkedIn will show the first two lines of the Summary (and then a prompt to “See More”). The preview is approximately 25-40 words (or 200-250 characters) — again, depending on the device.

Vanity URL (customizing your LinkedIn public profile URL):

30-character limit (5-character minimum)

http://www.linkedin.com/in/________

Cannot use spaces, symbols, or special characters

The customizable part of the URL is not case sensitive (JaneJobseeker, janejobseeker, and Janejobseeker will all point to the same profile).

The URL can be changed up to five times within six months (however, changing your URL frequently is not recommended). If a URL has been used and then changed, that URL will be unavailable for use by anyone for six months.

Website URL (links):

256-character limit

Status Update:

600-character limit

LinkedIn Publishing:

Headline: 100-character limit

Post: 40,000-character limit

Experience:

Job title: 100-character limit

Position description: 2000-character limit (200-character minimum)

Recommendations:

3,000-character limit

LinkedIn Groups:

Conversation title: 200-character limit

Body: 2,000-character limit

Comments: 1,000-character limit

Maximum Number of First Degree Connections:

30,000

Graphics:

Personal Profile Image: 

400 x 400

Maximum File Size: 8MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Personal Background Image:

1584 x 396

Maximum File Size: 8 MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Getting To Know The New LinkedIn

LinkedIn is currently rolling out what is being called the “new desktop experience.” Every two years or so, LinkedIn makes significant changes to the design and content of its website. The latest update — launched in late 2016/early 2017 — is designed to align the LinkedIn desktop experience with what users of the LinkedIn mobile app have seen for quite some time.

Ryan Roslansky, Vice President for Product at LinkedIn, said in a blog post in September 2016 that “this is the largest redesign since LinkedIn’s inception, and it’s the foundation for our future.”

One important thing to note is that every time LinkedIn rolls out a redesign, features are removed. This is the case with the “new desktop experience.” If you still have the “old” LinkedIn, take some time right now to backup your profile so that if you lose content in sections that are being removed, you can add that information back in.

You’ll know when you have the new look LinkedIn when you sign into your existing account. Not only will the main navigation bar look different, but LinkedIn will let you know your account has been updated to the new look. The rollout began in December 2016 and is expected to be completed by late Spring 2017 for all accounts.

The biggest change is how LinkedIn looks. The old navigation menu has been replaced with a more streamlined version. The old menu bar looked like this:

Old LinkedIn menu bar 

 The new menu bar looks like this:

New LinkedIn menu bar

The second biggest change is that some of the customization features have been removed — specifically, the ability to move around content within key sections (including Work Experience, Education, and Projects).

You used to be able to move one job position above another — great for jobseekers with two jobs at the same time — or reposition Projects in the order of importance (to you). You are no longer able to reposition items, except within the “Featured Skills & Endorsements” section.

The “Featured Skills & Endorsements” section allows the rearranging of items using a “Reorder” function. Click and drag the lines below “Reorder” to put the items in the order you want.

 

Skills & Endorsements section

 

The “Notify Your Network” setting has also changed significantly — that was the old name for the function that kept you from broadcasting profile changes to your network, which was a big alert that you may be preparing for a job search. That setting used to be right on the “Edit Profile” page, but now it’s three pages deep.

 

Here was how the old setting appeared:

                     Old “notify your network” setting toggle                               (used to be at lower right section of home page.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turning off global notification is now harder to find (it’s under “Privacy & Settings,” then click on “Privacy” and then “Sharing Profile Edits” and you’ll see the “on/off” switch — which I’m sure LinkedIn thinks is more descriptive than the old “Notify Your Network” yes/no).

Old OFF toggle switch for broadcasting activity


 

However, LinkedIn has also added it to the bottom of several of the input boxes — for example, in the “Experience” and “Education” sections.

 

Always use the setting “don’t update my network” – which is now located ‘3 clicks in’ to settings

 

 

But that actually makes it a bit more confusing. If you didn’t know there was a global setting for turning notifications off, you might accidentally be sending out notifications as you’re setting up your profile initially. ←–Be careful and go to settings right off the bat to verify you are not broadcasting all your activities. It’s getting to be more and more platforms leave your profile open by default so it is up to us to verify our own privacy level.


From a content standpoint, LinkedIn has severely reduced the new sections you can add to your profile.


Options for profile sections used to include:

• Education

• Work Experience

• Language

• Volunteering Experience

• Volunteering Opportunities

• Organizations

• Honors & Awards

• Test Scores

• Courses

• Patents

• Causes You Care About

• Supported Organizations

• Projects

• Publications

• Certifications

• Interests

• Personal Details

• Advice for Contacting

• Posts


Now the available profile sections are:

• Work Experience

• Education

• Volunteer Experience

• Skills

• Publications

• Certifications

• Courses

• Projects

• Honors & Awards

• Patents

• Test Scores

• Languages

• Organizations


Content that was previously in the sections that were removed simply disappears from the profile, so you need to go back and re-add information that has been stripped out (specifically, content that was in the “Causes You Care About” and “Supported Organizations” sections should be re-added into the “Volunteer Experience” section).

Another important section that was removed was “Advice for Contacting.” You should include your email address, phone numbers, and social media profile contacts at the bottom of your Summary. Doing this gives possible employment, recruiting, and other contacts a way to reach you outside of LinkedIn.


LinkedIn has also removed the “Profile Strength” indicator and emphasis on profile completeness — which is odd, since according to LinkedIn, users with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive opportunities through LinkedIn. Now it’s more difficult to tell when your profile is “complete.”

Here was the old “Profile Strength” indicator:

Old profile strength indicator on home page


 

 

 

 

 

  

Another big change — not unexpected, and not really a feature of the “new desktop experience” — but definitely set in stone now — is the change to InMails. Free accounts used to get a limited number of free InMails. Not anymore. Free accounts receive zero InMail credits, and the number of InMail credits depends on the Premium level selected (Career level gets 3 InMails per month for $24.99, all the way up to Hiring — this level gets 30 InMails for $99.99 per month).

LinkedIn free membership level used to grant you some inMail credits. That has ended and only paid members can send inMails. However if you are in the same group as the person you wish to contact then you can message them from within the group but I would not abuse that trick, lest you find yourself removed from the group for spamming or annoying members.


However, one thing that hasn’t changed is that you can still Message fellow Group members directly (even if they are 2nd or 3rd degree contacts), and that will get you around the InMail requirement. This is a great tip for networking your way to hiring managers within your industry.

If you are a member of a LinkedIn Group with the person you’re trying to contact, you can directly send a Message instead of having to send an InMail. But you can only do it from within the Group. When you are within the Group, click on the member’s name and you will see a “Message” button.

You can still message members of your same group even if on a free plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If, however, you just search for same person’s profile (outside the Group), you will see an “InMail” button instead. So if there is someone you want to connect with, first search your Groups and see if you are both members of the same Group.

InMail option available for free members from within groups

 

Speaking of Groups, the link to the Groups page is now harder to find. There used to be an Interests tab on the main menu, and Companies and Groups were under that.

Old groups menu location

Now, Groups are in the “More” section on the main navigation bar.

New location for groups

The main Search bar is now the “easiest” way to find Companies and Groups, but it’s definitely not as intuitive.

You can also use the direct URL for the Groups page:

http://www.linkedin.com/Groups


Because the “More” tab includes things like “Learning” and “Post a Job,” most casual users are likely to overlook the “Groups” button there. There also appears to be several versions of the “More” tab:

More products available

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More products available 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This just further demonstrates that LinkedIn is continuing to evolve, even as they roll out the “new look” LinkedIn.

LinkedIn has made a big point of its “real-time messaging” feature that is part of the “new look” LinkedIn. It now functions more like Facebook Messenger than an email, but most jobseekers don’t keep LinkedIn open on their computers (unlike Facebook, which LinkedIn seems to be comparing itself to).

For Connections, LinkedIn no longer asks you to specify how you know the person (Colleague, Classmate, We’ve Done Business Together, Friend, Other, I Don’t Know [name]). This is what the connection request used to look like:

Old connection invite message

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, if you click on the “Connect” button within the “People You May Know” section on the “My Network” page, it doesn’t give you the option of customizing the invite. It just sends it.

New connection request options

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want the “Add a Note” section to customize the LinkedIn connection request (which is highly recommended), you need to click on the person’s LinkedIn profile and then click on the “Connect” button.

 

Connect button where you add a note

 

Once you click on “Connect,” it will open up a new box to customize your LinkedIn invitation.

 

Option to customize invitation to connect always advised

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LinkedIn’s search capabilities for Free members have also been curtailed. You can search by your connections, location, current company, past company, industry, profile language, nonprofit interests, and schools. However, if you want to search by function, years of experience, and certain other criteria, you must upgrade to a LinkedIn Recruiter or Sales Navigator account. 


Here are the specific search functions LinkedIn has removed from all but the Recruiter and Sales Navigator accounts:

• Years of Experience

• Groups

• Function

• Seniority Level

• Interested In

• Company Size

• When Joined


For most jobseekers, that’s not a huge deal, those criteria can help you find recruiters and hiring managers. The old “Advanced Search” capabilities function is gone:

Old search function changed

Now, using the search box in the main navigation bar, you can “filter” your contacts (this is the new version of “Search”):

 

New people and company search

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’ll notice the mention of Premium level to access additional search functions.

There is also a strong emphasis on LinkedIn Publishing with the “new look.” If you’ve written an article recently, right on your home page, it tells you how many “Views of your article” you’ve received on your LinkedIn Publishing article. LinkedIn representatives announced recently that you will be able to search posts using the Search function sometime in the near future. They’re also spending a lot of money ($90 million, by one report) on LinkedIn Publishing — using human editors and algorithms to connect readers with relevant content.


Finally, while Introductions still appear to exist (at least in the Help documentation), LinkedIn is no longer emphasizing them, and the Help documentation on Introductions has been updated quite a bit recently as LinkedIn figures out if Introductions are going away permanently.


For example, the “Introductions — Overview” help page was recently updated:

Requesting an introduction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking of the Help pages, a lot of the Help documentation is currently in the process of being updated and you will see by the dates the ones that have been updated and the ones that haven’t been updated yet.

Display order of skills endorsements

Consequently, there are still a lot of old, inaccurate Help pages still out there that refer to things the way they were before the “new desktop experience.” You can expect that this will continue as LinkedIn works to update and/or replace hundreds of Help pages.

One of the best ways to stay connected with what’s new with LinkedIn is to check out the LinkedIn Blog. You can find it here:

https://blog.linkedin.com/

Follow LinkedIn Blog to stay informed about updates

So here is your to-do list:

• If you don’t yet have the “new look” LinkedIn, backup your existing LinkedIn profile so you don’t lose your information when your account is upgraded. Also, make sure your Work Experience and Education sections are in the order you want them to appear when the upgrade is made.

• If you do have the “new desktop experience” already, double-check your privacy settings. Go to “Privacy & Settings,” then click on “Privacy” and check each setting.

• Re-populate any information that may have been removed with the change to the “new look” — for example, putting your contact information at the bottom of the Summary section, or adding information to the “Volunteer Experience” section.

• Get familiar with where you can find your “Groups” now — either bookmark http://www.linkedin.com/Groups or explore the “More” tab on the main navigation menu.

• Try the “new look” LinkedIn search function on the main navigation menu. Type in a person’s name, company, or Group and explore the filter functions.

My 2017 Reflections Guide For an Improved Me (Grab a Free Copy)

Happy New Year 2017!  
Answer the questions to help you reflect and improve in the new year!

One last parting gift to help you bust into 2017.

We wanted to give our clients and followers with an adapted guide from one that has been used successfully by many people in 12 step fellowships to get to the heart of the issues in their lives that might be holding them back. While we make no express claims or guarantees about using the guide in our free resources and tools section, we do feel it is a good place to start in getting to the root of what could be holding you back from career and success in general. Take a look at some of the following questions you will answer as you work through the guide and if you would like to see more and give it a try just follow the link to the download page.

 

1) Am I generally restless, irritable (which means “easily annoyed”) and discontented

(which means “never satisfied”)? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I experience these feelings often? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I feel like I never belong or that I am not a part of, even at work or home? YES _____ NO_____.

Am I usually uncomfortable in my own skin? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I experience an ongoing sense of sadness? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I often feel like “something is missing”? YES

Does there always seem to be the same thing bothering me? YES _____ NO_____.

Can I easily solve a problem YES _____ NO_____.

Or does the problem linger for months or even years? YES _____ NO_____.

2) Am I having trouble managing my personal relationships?

Do I take care for others too much, to the point where I neglect to do the things I need to do to take care of myself? YES _____ NO_____.

Is there anyone in my life that dominates my thoughts, my actions or how I feel? YES_____NO_____.

Is there anyone in my life who is controlling me through their actions?

YES _____NO_____.

Do I snap at people or talk harshly? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I find I disagree with most people? YES _____ NO_____.

Do I always want things my own way? YES _____ NO_____.

Is there a personal or work relationship that ended that I refuse to give up on? YES _____ NO_____.

If so, do I keep trying to find ways to contact or see this person or company?

YES _____ NO_____.

Am I happy with the way things are in my current relationship or work status?

 

*If you would like to see more and give it a try just click the image below to the free tools download page*

*This guide is on the last 2 files at the bottom in both PDF and Word formats*

My 2017 Reflections Guide For An Improved Me

2017 Reflections Guide For An Improved Me

Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer

One of the parts of the client résumé we like to focus on at The Talent Mill are the action words and phrases that jump out at the reader when they first look at your career document.  Some argue that these words are just “fluff” and distract from the purpose of the résumé to list your skills and experiences.

I would say that synonyms have been around for as long as the English language so why not pick the best ones to describe what you’re good at? Why not tell them in the strongest terms just how your brand and experience translates into opportunities for their company?  To this end, I have included a link I came across that helps you find alternate words per skill set.

“Listing of critical action verbs organized by skills. Action verbs describe key job-seeker skills and accomplishments and make employers take notice.”

Source: Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer