Tag: jobseeker

7 Steps – How to Use LinkedIn to Get Hired

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Always remember to explain, provide evidence, and create your own narrative online, before someone else does it for you.

If you want to follow the 7 steps to do it all yourself just scroll halfway down the page below the image of an optimized LinkedIn profile. Don’t forget to come back and comment here, or reach out to me directly to let me know how this strategy has or has not worked for you.

Why Hire Me

JOB SEARCH TIPS BLOG
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WHO I AM – WHY HIRE ME TO HELP:

I am a Nationally Certified Online Profile Expert (NCOPE), and an active member of The National Résumé Writers Association. I was The NRWA’s Education Chair for a few months in 2012 and then I went on to serve 5 years as their first Social Media Community Manager.

  • I’ve spent 7+ years, developing résumés and profiles that convert into interviews and new jobs for job seekers.
  • Prior to that I was a Fleet & Operations Manager for 7 years that worked closely with Human Resources to recruit both drivers and operations staff.
  • I handled inbound candidates through the complete hiring lifecycle from their recruitment, to their interview, and thereafter where I was tasked to make hiring recommendations to my superiors. Finally once hired, I handled new employee on-boarding and training.
  • I became very passionate about putting the right (peg) candidate in the right (hole) job.
  • On average – 75% of my clients see an increase in LinkedIn profile views within days after I revamp their profile.
  • 85% of my résumé and or LinkedIn clients receive calls for an interview.
  • As of our most recent client feedback survey, we were thrilled to learn that an average of 75% of our clients have been interviewed or hired after we helped them with their career documents and LinkedIn profile.
  • We work with clients from all around the United States remotely using Skype, FaceTime, and other similar video chat options along with phone, text, and email to optimize their career brand.

WHAT CLIENTS SAY ABOUT ME:

To see valid, verifiable reviews of my resume writing business, written by my clients, please see Google reviews –> click here and also visit my LinkedIn recommendations, and a few Yelp reviews below.

WHY OPTIMIZE YOUR PROFILE:

Since Microsoft purchased LinkedIn last year and made changes to the platform, it has become the “place to be found for jobs.” Satya Nadella, C.E.O. of Microsoft specifically talked about integrating LinkedIn profiles with Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint, Skype, the Windows operating system, and other Microsoft products. To make members more productive and efficient in their search for work, Microsoft also plans to integrate Cortana, its digital assistant, with LinkedIn. The purchase of the platform also offers Microsoft plenty of user data about where LinkedIn members have worked, have gone to school, their hobbies, interests and more. Microsoft has improved the various paid service tiers for business users as well as LinkedIn Sales Navigator for building leads, and LinkedIn Recruiter for gathering all the information in one place about potential job candidates.

It is beneficial to you to become aware that in 2019, Recruiters are NOT waiting for applications. Often, they tell us that they are not even posting the open jobs on the web, and instead, they are actively searching for candidates on LinkedIn. This is why it is more urgent than ever that you are on the platform and that your profile has the correct keyword density and weight in different sections so it can rise in a recruiter search, so you can land on their short interview list.

WHAT MY LINKEDIN OPTIMIZATION SERVICE INCLUDES:

I help give people of all ages and industries a better chance of being called for an interview by keyword optimizing and developing a compelling LinkedIn profile for them.

  • This includes creating a keyword banner image from your résumé or offering alternate images related to their target industry.
  • Uploading and editing a new professional profile picture if needed that client provides.
  • Writing an impactful headline that shows measurable results right away. (See mine for an example at https://linkedin.com/in/MillMontejo)
  • Writing a keyword infused and grammatically correct summary of just under the 2000 character limit.
  • Finding alternate industry keywords you are missing and adding them so you can be found for them too.
  • Adding an education section with classes taken which will help raise your chances of being found as a candidate even if you did not achieve the degree.
  • Suggesting industry groups that you should join and adding an industry for you.
  • Provide step by step videos and tutorials on how to work your LinkedIn so you can be found for work.
LinkedIn Page After Optimization
Pharmaceutical Sales Rep – LinkedIn Profile After Optimization

✅ Want to do it yourself? Follow these 7 steps to success:

  1. A profile with a profile photo can result in 14x more views by recruiters and hiring managers than one without a photo.
  2. A 1st person conversational summary of at least 40 words and up to 2000 characters ranks high in Recruiter searches and is a prime section to add industry keywords related to your target 🎯 job role.
  3. Adding an industry to your profile can land you 15x more profile views.
  4. Members that include skills in their profile (up to 50) are 13x more likely to get profile views. Remember to add skills that mean the same thing but written in a different way to increase your chances of being found in a skills search.
  5. Members who include an Education section on their profile are 10x more likely to be found in a recruiter search. So even if you have not finished your studies or took some classes or semesters, list them anyway. Just write ‘pending’ or ‘in progress’ or ‘classes towards – major.’
  6. Make sure to add any volunteer experience in its own section or in the work history section to fill in for a gap in paid work. 42% of hiring managers surveyed by LinkedIn said they view volunteer experience as equivalent to traditional work experience.
  7. Make sure to join groups in your target 🎯 industry and engage in likes, comments, and conversation. Your profile is 5x more likely to turn up in a search result if you join and are active in groups.

Mill Montejo & The Talent Mill Team

https://JobSearchSuperhero.com website & blog
CONTACT THE JOB SEARCH SUPERHERO FOR HELP!

201-667-2994

⬇ I also answer job seekers questions on Quora ⬇
https://www.quora.com/profile/Mill-Montejo
Upload your résumé for a free critique where we tell you exactly how we can help & give you personalized project quote.
Upload your résumé for a free critique where we tell you exactly how we can help & give you personalized project quote.
Pick 3 dates on calendar and we will call you for a 20 minute no obligation, FREE phone consult about your career goals.

LinkedIn Success To Do List

LinkedIn currently has more than 277 million users in 200 countries and territories around the world, They host 3 million business pages, 2.1 million groups, and 77% of all published jobs. So it’s easy to understand why LinkedIn is the most popular social networking site for professionals, job seekers, and businesses, and enterpreneurs selling their services. About 48% of recruiters post their jobs exclusively on LinkedIn. After the recent Microsoft purchase, LinkedIn is only expected to grow more as Microsoft is certain to integrate some or all of its Office 365 Cloud products with the platform.

Getting to know how to navigate LinkedIn is very important for professionals in active or passive job searches. The following list has been compiled from the collective expertise of knowledgeable recruiters and resume writer colleagues that have spent years assisting job seekers with their career documents as well as LinkedIn profiles.

  • A professional photo
  • A customized profile URL
  • A keyword injected headline
  • A profile summary rich in keywords that sets you apart from the crowd
  • A concise career story that is easy to understand
  • Profile sections structured so that your career trajectory is easy to read
  • Powerful action based statements
  • Quantified achievements per job role
  • At least 50 skills that connections can endorse you for
  • Be a member of at least 2 LinkedIn groups 
  • Have at least 2-3 recommendations or more
  • Showcase certificates and highlight your education

 

Profile Sections Character Counts and Image Dimensions

With the release of the “new desktop experience” for LinkedIn in early 2017, some of the character limits and graphic sizes have changed. This cheat sheet will provide a quick reference to the current guidelines (as of November 2017).

Character counts on LinkedIn include letters, numbers, spaces, and punctuation.

Name field:

First name: 20-character limit

Last name: 40-character limit

Headline:

120-character limit

Summary:

2,000-character limit

Summary preview:

Depending on the device being used (desktop vs. mobile), LinkedIn will show the first two lines of the Summary (and then a prompt to “See More”). The preview is approximately 25-40 words (or 200-250 characters) — again, depending on the device.

Vanity URL (customizing your LinkedIn public profile URL):

30-character limit (5-character minimum)

http://www.linkedin.com/in/________

Cannot use spaces, symbols, or special characters

The customizable part of the URL is not case sensitive (JaneJobseeker, janejobseeker, and Janejobseeker will all point to the same profile).

The URL can be changed up to five times within six months (however, changing your URL frequently is not recommended). If a URL has been used and then changed, that URL will be unavailable for use by anyone for six months.

Website URL (links):

256-character limit

Status Update:

600-character limit

LinkedIn Publishing:

Headline: 100-character limit

Post: 40,000-character limit

Experience:

Job title: 100-character limit

Position description: 2000-character limit (200-character minimum)

Recommendations:

3,000-character limit

LinkedIn Groups:

Conversation title: 200-character limit

Body: 2,000-character limit

Comments: 1,000-character limit

Maximum Number of First Degree Connections:

30,000

Graphics:

Personal Profile Image: 

400 x 400

Maximum File Size: 8MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Personal Background Image:

1584 x 396

Maximum File Size: 8 MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Getting To Know The New LinkedIn

LinkedIn is currently rolling out what is being called the “new desktop experience.” Every two years or so, LinkedIn makes significant changes to the design and content of its website. The latest update — launched in late 2016/early 2017 — is designed to align the LinkedIn desktop experience with what users of the LinkedIn mobile app have seen for quite some time.

Ryan Roslansky, Vice President for Product at LinkedIn, said in a blog post in September 2016 that “this is the largest redesign since LinkedIn’s inception, and it’s the foundation for our future.”

One important thing to note is that every time LinkedIn rolls out a redesign, features are removed. This is the case with the “new desktop experience.” If you still have the “old” LinkedIn, take some time right now to backup your profile so that if you lose content in sections that are being removed, you can add that information back in.

You’ll know when you have the new look LinkedIn when you sign into your existing account. Not only will the main navigation bar look different, but LinkedIn will let you know your account has been updated to the new look. The rollout began in December 2016 and is expected to be completed by late Spring 2017 for all accounts.

The biggest change is how LinkedIn looks. The old navigation menu has been replaced with a more streamlined version. The old menu bar looked like this:

Old LinkedIn menu bar 

 The new menu bar looks like this:

New LinkedIn menu bar

The second biggest change is that some of the customization features have been removed — specifically, the ability to move around content within key sections (including Work Experience, Education, and Projects).

You used to be able to move one job position above another — great for jobseekers with two jobs at the same time — or reposition Projects in the order of importance (to you). You are no longer able to reposition items, except within the “Featured Skills & Endorsements” section.

The “Featured Skills & Endorsements” section allows the rearranging of items using a “Reorder” function. Click and drag the lines below “Reorder” to put the items in the order you want.

 

Skills & Endorsements section

 

The “Notify Your Network” setting has also changed significantly — that was the old name for the function that kept you from broadcasting profile changes to your network, which was a big alert that you may be preparing for a job search. That setting used to be right on the “Edit Profile” page, but now it’s three pages deep.

 

Here was how the old setting appeared:

                     Old “notify your network” setting toggle                               (used to be at lower right section of home page.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turning off global notification is now harder to find (it’s under “Privacy & Settings,” then click on “Privacy” and then “Sharing Profile Edits” and you’ll see the “on/off” switch — which I’m sure LinkedIn thinks is more descriptive than the old “Notify Your Network” yes/no).

Old OFF toggle switch for broadcasting activity


 

However, LinkedIn has also added it to the bottom of several of the input boxes — for example, in the “Experience” and “Education” sections.

 

Always use the setting “don’t update my network” – which is now located ‘3 clicks in’ to settings

 

 

But that actually makes it a bit more confusing. If you didn’t know there was a global setting for turning notifications off, you might accidentally be sending out notifications as you’re setting up your profile initially. ←–Be careful and go to settings right off the bat to verify you are not broadcasting all your activities. It’s getting to be more and more platforms leave your profile open by default so it is up to us to verify our own privacy level.


From a content standpoint, LinkedIn has severely reduced the new sections you can add to your profile.


Options for profile sections used to include:

• Education

• Work Experience

• Language

• Volunteering Experience

• Volunteering Opportunities

• Organizations

• Honors & Awards

• Test Scores

• Courses

• Patents

• Causes You Care About

• Supported Organizations

• Projects

• Publications

• Certifications

• Interests

• Personal Details

• Advice for Contacting

• Posts


Now the available profile sections are:

• Work Experience

• Education

• Volunteer Experience

• Skills

• Publications

• Certifications

• Courses

• Projects

• Honors & Awards

• Patents

• Test Scores

• Languages

• Organizations


Content that was previously in the sections that were removed simply disappears from the profile, so you need to go back and re-add information that has been stripped out (specifically, content that was in the “Causes You Care About” and “Supported Organizations” sections should be re-added into the “Volunteer Experience” section).

Another important section that was removed was “Advice for Contacting.” You should include your email address, phone numbers, and social media profile contacts at the bottom of your Summary. Doing this gives possible employment, recruiting, and other contacts a way to reach you outside of LinkedIn.


LinkedIn has also removed the “Profile Strength” indicator and emphasis on profile completeness — which is odd, since according to LinkedIn, users with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive opportunities through LinkedIn. Now it’s more difficult to tell when your profile is “complete.”

Here was the old “Profile Strength” indicator:

Old profile strength indicator on home page


 

 

 

 

 

  

Another big change — not unexpected, and not really a feature of the “new desktop experience” — but definitely set in stone now — is the change to InMails. Free accounts used to get a limited number of free InMails. Not anymore. Free accounts receive zero InMail credits, and the number of InMail credits depends on the Premium level selected (Career level gets 3 InMails per month for $24.99, all the way up to Hiring — this level gets 30 InMails for $99.99 per month).

LinkedIn free membership level used to grant you some inMail credits. That has ended and only paid members can send inMails. However if you are in the same group as the person you wish to contact then you can message them from within the group but I would not abuse that trick, lest you find yourself removed from the group for spamming or annoying members.


However, one thing that hasn’t changed is that you can still Message fellow Group members directly (even if they are 2nd or 3rd degree contacts), and that will get you around the InMail requirement. This is a great tip for networking your way to hiring managers within your industry.

If you are a member of a LinkedIn Group with the person you’re trying to contact, you can directly send a Message instead of having to send an InMail. But you can only do it from within the Group. When you are within the Group, click on the member’s name and you will see a “Message” button.

You can still message members of your same group even if on a free plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If, however, you just search for same person’s profile (outside the Group), you will see an “InMail” button instead. So if there is someone you want to connect with, first search your Groups and see if you are both members of the same Group.

InMail option available for free members from within groups

 

Speaking of Groups, the link to the Groups page is now harder to find. There used to be an Interests tab on the main menu, and Companies and Groups were under that.

Old groups menu location

Now, Groups are in the “More” section on the main navigation bar.

New location for groups

The main Search bar is now the “easiest” way to find Companies and Groups, but it’s definitely not as intuitive.

You can also use the direct URL for the Groups page:

http://www.linkedin.com/Groups


Because the “More” tab includes things like “Learning” and “Post a Job,” most casual users are likely to overlook the “Groups” button there. There also appears to be several versions of the “More” tab:

More products available

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More products available 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This just further demonstrates that LinkedIn is continuing to evolve, even as they roll out the “new look” LinkedIn.

LinkedIn has made a big point of its “real-time messaging” feature that is part of the “new look” LinkedIn. It now functions more like Facebook Messenger than an email, but most jobseekers don’t keep LinkedIn open on their computers (unlike Facebook, which LinkedIn seems to be comparing itself to).

For Connections, LinkedIn no longer asks you to specify how you know the person (Colleague, Classmate, We’ve Done Business Together, Friend, Other, I Don’t Know [name]). This is what the connection request used to look like:

Old connection invite message

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, if you click on the “Connect” button within the “People You May Know” section on the “My Network” page, it doesn’t give you the option of customizing the invite. It just sends it.

New connection request options

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want the “Add a Note” section to customize the LinkedIn connection request (which is highly recommended), you need to click on the person’s LinkedIn profile and then click on the “Connect” button.

 

Connect button where you add a note

 

Once you click on “Connect,” it will open up a new box to customize your LinkedIn invitation.

 

Option to customize invitation to connect always advised

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LinkedIn’s search capabilities for Free members have also been curtailed. You can search by your connections, location, current company, past company, industry, profile language, nonprofit interests, and schools. However, if you want to search by function, years of experience, and certain other criteria, you must upgrade to a LinkedIn Recruiter or Sales Navigator account. 


Here are the specific search functions LinkedIn has removed from all but the Recruiter and Sales Navigator accounts:

• Years of Experience

• Groups

• Function

• Seniority Level

• Interested In

• Company Size

• When Joined


For most jobseekers, that’s not a huge deal, those criteria can help you find recruiters and hiring managers. The old “Advanced Search” capabilities function is gone:

Old search function changed

Now, using the search box in the main navigation bar, you can “filter” your contacts (this is the new version of “Search”):

 

New people and company search

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’ll notice the mention of Premium level to access additional search functions.

There is also a strong emphasis on LinkedIn Publishing with the “new look.” If you’ve written an article recently, right on your home page, it tells you how many “Views of your article” you’ve received on your LinkedIn Publishing article. LinkedIn representatives announced recently that you will be able to search posts using the Search function sometime in the near future. They’re also spending a lot of money ($90 million, by one report) on LinkedIn Publishing — using human editors and algorithms to connect readers with relevant content.


Finally, while Introductions still appear to exist (at least in the Help documentation), LinkedIn is no longer emphasizing them, and the Help documentation on Introductions has been updated quite a bit recently as LinkedIn figures out if Introductions are going away permanently.


For example, the “Introductions — Overview” help page was recently updated:

Requesting an introduction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking of the Help pages, a lot of the Help documentation is currently in the process of being updated and you will see by the dates the ones that have been updated and the ones that haven’t been updated yet.

Display order of skills endorsements

Consequently, there are still a lot of old, inaccurate Help pages still out there that refer to things the way they were before the “new desktop experience.” You can expect that this will continue as LinkedIn works to update and/or replace hundreds of Help pages.

One of the best ways to stay connected with what’s new with LinkedIn is to check out the LinkedIn Blog. You can find it here:

https://blog.linkedin.com/

Follow LinkedIn Blog to stay informed about updates

So here is your to-do list:

• If you don’t yet have the “new look” LinkedIn, backup your existing LinkedIn profile so you don’t lose your information when your account is upgraded. Also, make sure your Work Experience and Education sections are in the order you want them to appear when the upgrade is made.

• If you do have the “new desktop experience” already, double-check your privacy settings. Go to “Privacy & Settings,” then click on “Privacy” and check each setting.

• Re-populate any information that may have been removed with the change to the “new look” — for example, putting your contact information at the bottom of the Summary section, or adding information to the “Volunteer Experience” section.

• Get familiar with where you can find your “Groups” now — either bookmark http://www.linkedin.com/Groups or explore the “More” tab on the main navigation menu.

• Try the “new look” LinkedIn search function on the main navigation menu. Type in a person’s name, company, or Group and explore the filter functions.

Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer

One of the parts of the client résumé we like to focus on at The Talent Mill are the action words and phrases that jump out at the reader when they first look at your career document.  Some argue that these words are just “fluff” and distract from the purpose of the résumé to list your skills and experiences.

I would say that synonyms have been around for as long as the English language so why not pick the best ones to describe what you’re good at? Why not tell them in the strongest terms just how your brand and experience translates into opportunities for their company?  To this end, I have included a link I came across that helps you find alternate words per skill set.

“Listing of critical action verbs organized by skills. Action verbs describe key job-seeker skills and accomplishments and make employers take notice.”

Source: Job-Seeker Action Verbs — By Skills Sets | Quintessential LiveCareer