Tag: linkedin

How to Handle a Job Interview If You Were Fired

by The Job Search Superhero Coaching Team

 

Many job-seekers today are using the web and apps to search for jobs all the time. From the time during World War II when health benefits became tied to our jobs, in many situations’ employees have been overstaying their productive years of service to an employer just to maintain their health benefits. Work scenarios like this can become toxic and inefficient as the unhappy employee tries to keep a balance between working at their current job while trying to search for their next job. In this article that speaks to why employers pay health insurance in the first place, Daniel Akst explains several ways that our current economy is being hurt by this continued practice. Although the article is from 2003, its many points are still relevant today.

Is your current job making you miserable?          Were you fired?

“There is no good reason for any of this, aside from historical accident. During World War II, federal wage controls prevented employers from wooing workers with higher pay, so companies started offering health insurance as a way around the law.” Of course, this form of compensation is still considered a form of payment as part of the hiring package today. When the war ended, the practice stuck and the rest, as they say, is history.

WWII tied US health benefits to employer

When employees try to conduct private job searches, they are caught in a precarious situation where they must try to look for their new job while still working for the current one that’s making them miserable. It is a fine line to walk.

Despite LinkedIn’s Open Candidate feature stating that they will try not to reveal your job search to your current employer, they explicitly say that there are no guarantees. If you find yourself in a situation where your employer finds out you’re looking to make a move and fires you, then that brings an added issue for your next interview. If you are at all concerned that the new company you are applying with will check all of your references then be upfront. At the very least most potential employers are sure to ask why you left your last job.

If you’re actively looking for work you should turn this feature on, however if you’re still employed be very careful.

If you find that the jobs you are interviewing are in line with your skills, but you aren’t going far in the interview process once they find out you were fired, you might be getting blacklisted. But don’t worry, there are ways to overcome this problem, and we can help. Besides helping our clients with mock interviews for their interview practice and preparation, we also help them to formulate their responses to the tough questions about why they were fired from their last job.

You’re fired now what?

As difficult as it seems, the best industry advice is that if you know they will verify your employment, then bring the topic of your being fired up yourself. Being upfront and honest about how you parted ways with your last employer has been shown to be the best approach for this difficult situation.

 

1) We know that it sounds better to use the terminology “I was let go because…” as opposed to “I was fired because…” so make sure to use the first and not the second statement.

2) Explain why you were let go. Do not go into extra details or information they did not ask for. Remember “less is more.”

3) Explain what you learned from that experience and how you will use your newfound knowledge to improve in your next job role.

For Example:

“Unfortunately, I was let go from my last job. I learned a lot from this experience and found out that I really thrive in job roles that engage in (fill in the blank from job ad). I am very excited about and interested in this job because (fill in the blank from job ad) is one of my strongest skills and that seems to be one of the most important duties of this job role.”

You will still likely encounter some people that don’t want to hire you because you were let go. It is out of your control that some companies can’t look past your imperfect work history and give you a chance. We personally believe that everyone deserves a second chance to prove themselves and there are many others out there that will too. The interviewer could be passing up on the most successful and dedicated employee, and it’s your job to convince them that your seemingly lousy experience actually helped you grow and learn a valuable lesson you can bring you to your next work assignment.

 

Practice practice practice in mock interviews!

Make sure to start developing your LinkedIn profile and working on getting recommendations from former co-workers at your previous employer if they are willing to do this. Or they can write you an email reference. Remember to start building connections on LinkedIn and in local community career groups as they can help tell you about open jobs and perhaps get you in there with a word to the hiring manager.

Build your network before you need it

You should always anticipate that the company or recruiter will likely reach out to your past employer to try to get their side of the story. Fortunately, most companies are afraid of lawsuits, so the usual safe reply they stick to is “we only confirm dates of employment and job title.” One of the services we provide to our clients is to call their past employers for professional references and then we report what they say back to our job-seeking candidate. This way they can know what their last employer is saying about their time working for them. Many companies have existing employees sign non-disclosure and separation agreements before they release any severance pay. Make sure to read the fine print that way you will know if either one of you are violating the terms of your separation agreement.

Do your own background check pre-interview or hire a professional agency like The Talent Mill to do it for you.

Remember that you are not the first to be let go from a job, or to leave on bad terms. Many have found great jobs after that. So, don’t let anxiety kill your job search and stick to your exit story. Do not embellish. Do not talk bad about your previous employer, and just explain how valuable the experience was and how you will switch it up and use it to do better work.

Think positive thoughts. Practice your interview. Believe that you too can be hired = You are hired!

 

 

As always, we wish you the best of luck in your job search! 🙂

 

P.S. Look for new job search resource documents and templates to be added to our site in the coming weeks as we work to add more helpful tools for your career toolkit.

 

 

 

 

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General Disclaimer

We at JobSearchSuperhero.com, including The Talent Mill and/or Mill Montejo, are not recruiters. We do not provide, intend to provide or claim to provide job matching services. We provide coaching services utilizing our industry experience and the knowledge gained through our membership with various résumé writing and career non-profit organizations. We develop tools and methods also used by other national career coaches in order to help our clients job search. We do not and will not place individuals into any new jobs, positions or industries. We do not claim or guarantee that by purchasing our services you will find a job. These results are strictly dependent on the individual and the actions each individual takes given tips, resources, training, and advice, as well as the individual job-seeker’s personal interview style.  You alone are responsible for your actions and your results in your professional career. Any statements, training, advice, reports or mock interviews provided within our services, seminars, webinars, videos, chats, phone calls, and/or meetings are strictly our professional opinion. By law we make no guarantees or claims that you will achieve any results, including without limitation financial or employment benefits, from any of the service or opinions offered by JobSearchSuperhero.com.

 

 

 

If You’re Not on The Web, You’re Dead – Ten Reasons Why

By Mill Montejo the #JobSearchSuperhero

 

Ever since I left Corporate America in 2012 I have worked hard to increase my online presence through many social platforms. The inner geek in me saw the technology changes and direction many industries were taking and are continuing to head into.

If you’re not on the web you may as well be dead

I must share that many of my resume and LinkedIn clients often complain about how the nature of hiring has changed so drastically that they spend months looking for work to no avail. What are they doing wrong? Highly qualified, great references, yet no calls for an interview! The facts are simply this. Gone are the days when you could peruse a help wanted ad in the NY Times send out 40 resumes by “snail mail” and get someone to see or respond. Technology has made it possible for current employers to do more with less. On the bright side, using the same technology new industries have emerged that allow people to employ themselves with the biggest perk being flexible work schedules.

By using crowdsourced data, companies are helping to make life more efficient today for society at large. My goal is to educate clients on how we are entering the height of the technological revolution and there is no placing that ‘genie back in the bottle.’ As hard as it is to hear and accept, if you are not on the web, you may as well be dead.

the tech-genie is never going back into the bottle and is here to stay

So, if you want to be found in today’s changing technological world, you MUST have some type of web presence or you are invisible. You won’t be found and it will be extremely challenging to find that job or get that client if you work for yourself.  We need to adapt and change HOW we get noticed and connect through forums like LinkedIn or your own personal websites. If you are not on the web, you are dead.

 

Here are 10 things everyone should know about the web and how to use it to your advantage:

  1. You have to reinvent yourself. After years of work, today’s job market has changed tremendously. It used to be the norm that you could find ads online, send your resume that read “proven track record in…” Now resumes must be keyword heavy, with no grammatical or spelling errors, and plenty of numbers and facts to back up the “proven track record” you are claiming. There are many experienced job seekers for less available open jobs. It is an employers job market.
  2. Many job seekers still have a hard time believing that they can also find work by selling the skills they have built up through the years whether in school, work, or life.
  3. All they have to do is find a way to solve local people’s problems.
  4. Crowdsourcing apps WORK because people want to find the help that they need easily, quickly, and with the touch of a phone screen

If you have a smartphone in your purse or pocket then you know there is nothing more convenient than summoning it for everything you need

        For Example:

a) I needed a dog sitter quickly to check in on my new puppy on Fathers Day so I went on Rover.com’s app. Within a couple hours, a dog sitter was in my yard meeting my dog.

Need a dog sitter in a hurry? There’s an app for that.

b) I needed a gutter and tree trimming contractor. I found them via my local neighbor recommendations on the Nextdoor app that started as a neighborhood watch app and has grown to include home sales, garage sales, contractor recommendations and more.

Need any type of home services or repairs? There’s an app for that too.

c) Need an order of food picked up at a local restaurant that does not offer delivery? There are people who drive their own vehicles that now provide that service.

Think about where there are needs and sell your skills there. Go where the needs for services are.

5. People want convenience and are willing to spend a little extra, or in different ways to achieve it. Technological advances have put many people out of work, but they are also creating new innovative, and more flexible ways to work. 

6. Going to a new state and need a cheap place to stay for a couple of days? All the hotels booked or too expensive? Check out Airbnb where people like you and me rent out their couches, bedrooms, or garages for temporary use.

7. Need a last-minute ride somewhere local and can’t find a taxi or car service that has available cars? If you’re in an urban area or large city you can see available cars practically circling your home or location on a live map on your phone and summon them for a quick ride.

8. We must accept the fact that this tech-genie will never be put back into the bottle. You must adapt and change to survive in the digital economy and job market.

9. Don’t waste your energy on anger, resentment, fear of the future, and anxiety. If you can, instead turn that into renewed energy and think hard about your skills and how you can market and sell them to your local public.

10. In some cases, your clients don’t even have to be local. Because of the very same technology that’s put you out of work, people can reach and teach others stuff across the globe. If you produce online goods or services that others are willing to pay for then you can work from anywhere and make money.

 

In closing I would say that you have to think of everything as being able to be crowdsourced through an app or a website. Merriam Webster defines crowdsourcing as “the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people and especially from the online community rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.” If you teach guitar, get on a crowdsourcing app, if you teach art, do the same. The jobs and exposure could add up to future and steady repeat clients, or recruiters and employers wanting to interview you.

Want us to help you get started, or do it all for you including sending out resumes, Myers-Briggs Testing, and personal reference and background checks on yourself so you know what they’re saying about you? Send us a message at

JobSearchSuperhero.com/contact-form or see all services and schedule a time to chat with us at

TheTalentMill | JobSearchSuperhero Calendar.

JOB SEARCH TIPS BLOG

LinkedIn Success To Do List

LinkedIn currently has more than 277 million users in 200 countries and territories around the world, They host 3 million business pages, 2.1 million groups, and 77% of all published jobs. So it’s easy to understand why LinkedIn is the most popular social networking site for professionals, job seekers, and businesses, and enterpreneurs selling their services. About 48% of recruiters post their jobs exclusively on LinkedIn. After the recent Microsoft purchase, LinkedIn is only expected to grow more as Microsoft is certain to integrate some or all of its Office 365 Cloud products with the platform.

Getting to know how to navigate LinkedIn is very important for professionals in active or passive job searches. The following list has been compiled from the collective expertise of knowledgeable recruiters and resume writer colleagues that have spent years assisting job seekers with their career documents as well as LinkedIn profiles.

  • A professional photo
  • A customized profile URL
  • A keyword injected headline
  • A profile summary rich in keywords that sets you apart from the crowd
  • A concise career story that is easy to understand
  • Profile sections structured so that your career trajectory is easy to read
  • Powerful action based statements
  • Quantified achievements per job role
  • At least 50 skills that connections can endorse you for
  • Be a member of at least 2 LinkedIn groups 
  • Have at least 2-3 recommendations or more
  • Showcase certificates and highlight your education

 

Profile Sections Character Counts and Image Dimensions

With the release of the “new desktop experience” for LinkedIn in early 2017, some of the character limits and graphic sizes have changed. This cheat sheet will provide a quick reference to the current guidelines (as of November 2017).

Character counts on LinkedIn include letters, numbers, spaces, and punctuation.

Name field:

First name: 20-character limit

Last name: 40-character limit

Headline:

120-character limit

Summary:

2,000-character limit

Summary preview:

Depending on the device being used (desktop vs. mobile), LinkedIn will show the first two lines of the Summary (and then a prompt to “See More”). The preview is approximately 25-40 words (or 200-250 characters) — again, depending on the device.

Vanity URL (customizing your LinkedIn public profile URL):

30-character limit (5-character minimum)

http://www.linkedin.com/in/________

Cannot use spaces, symbols, or special characters

The customizable part of the URL is not case sensitive (JaneJobseeker, janejobseeker, and Janejobseeker will all point to the same profile).

The URL can be changed up to five times within six months (however, changing your URL frequently is not recommended). If a URL has been used and then changed, that URL will be unavailable for use by anyone for six months.

Website URL (links):

256-character limit

Status Update:

600-character limit

LinkedIn Publishing:

Headline: 100-character limit

Post: 40,000-character limit

Experience:

Job title: 100-character limit

Position description: 2000-character limit (200-character minimum)

Recommendations:

3,000-character limit

LinkedIn Groups:

Conversation title: 200-character limit

Body: 2,000-character limit

Comments: 1,000-character limit

Maximum Number of First Degree Connections:

30,000

Graphics:

Personal Profile Image: 

400 x 400

Maximum File Size: 8MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Personal Background Image:

1584 x 396

Maximum File Size: 8 MB

Acceptable File Formats: PNG, JPG, GIF

Urgent Before You Tune Out For the Holidays You Must Do This for Your LinkedIn Profile!

Check out The Essential Guide For Backing Up Your LinkedIn Profile (back up, save to PDF, and request your LinkedIn profile archives.)


https://www.slideshare.net/careermill/the-essential-guide-for-backing-up-your-linkedin-profile  

With the site getting ready to make some major upgrades as the year comes to a close we are telling all our clients to make sure to save their profile to PDF and zip archive. This is important in case there are any issues with loss of data so you don’t have to start from scratch in building your connections. 

We hope you enjoy a safe and happy holiday season with your loved ones.